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Person Centred Practice in a Changing Environment Conference 2016

April, 2016

The Person Centred Practice in a Changing Environment Conference was held to consider how person centered practice can remain the focus as the mental health sector undergoes major reform. Internationally renowned local, state and national speakers were involved.  People living with mental illness, families and friends, community members, community groups, policy makers, service providers (from across a range of service responses including disability, housing, alcohol and drug) attended and contributed.

Door of Hope Conference Centre Launceston , TAS
Australia

Day 1 Welcome to Country

27 April, 2016

In the spirit of Reconciliation, we were welcomed to country by Aunty Dawn of the University of Tasmania's Riawanna Centre.

The Riawunna Centre provides a welcoming space for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to meet, study and access academic and pastoral support and assistance. The staff are highly committed to supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, staff and communities to achieve their education aspirations.

The Centre also provides information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and societies, promotes cross-cultural understandings, and is a prominent place within the University for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander values, traditions and discourses.

Video

PIR 2016 D1 Welcome to Country Aunty Dawn

PIR 2016 D1 Welcome to Country Aunty Dawn

Sandy Jeffs: Death-Sentence to Healing Words: a meditation on poetry, madness and recovery?

27 April, 2016

Sandy Jeffs was among the first wave of Australian consumers in the 1980s to speak out publically about living with schizophrenia which she has lived with for nearly 40 years. She describes herself as a public loony and as a relic from the old days. Through her public speaking and advocacy, Sandy has been a human face to this often misunderstood and disputed condition. Sandy also describes herself as an old and submerging poet who has now published seven books of poetry including her best-selling Poems from the Madhouse. Her madness has informed much of her writing. In 2009 her memoir, Flying with Paper Wings: Reflections on Living with Madness, was published. Sandy’s latest poetry collections, published in 2015, are: Chiaroscuro with Black Pepper Publishing and The Mad Poet’s Tea Party with Spinifex Press. Sandy lives on the outskirts of Melbourne with her friends and animals in a place where it is Christmas every day.

 

Video

PIR 2016 D1 Sandy Jeffs

PIR 2016 D1 Sandy Jeffs

Day 1 Flick Grey: Open Dialogue for Australia

27 April, 2016

Flick Grey is a researcher, trainer, supervisor and consultant in mental health. Trained in sociology and linguistics, she has been involved for ten years in the consumer movement, including working for three years as Resource Co-ordinator at Our Consumer Place. She has spent many years searching for approaches in mental health that honour the human spirit and respect the meaning in distress and madness. This has led to becoming an accredited Intentional Peer Support trainer, a Consumer Academic (at the University of Melbourne and RMIT), being involved in the international Hearing Voices movement, supervising clinicians and consumer workers, freelance consulting and training work and studying Open Dialogue in the UK. In 2015, she was awarded the SANE Hocking Fellowship to study the intersection between Open Dialogue and peer work and will soon be travelling to Finland, Germany, the US and UK to study how these two movements have been brought together. She is also currently employed part-time as a consumer consultant in a public mental health service in Melbourne. At some stage soon, she hopes to finish her sociological PhD, entitled ‘benevolent othering.

Video

PIR 2016 D1 Flick Grey

PIR 2016 D1 Flick Grey

Panel: Transition to NDIS - Implications for Partners in Recovery

27 April, 2016

After lunch on Day 1, Andrew Davis, our MC, introduced National Disability Insurance Australia, Tasmanian Trial Site Manager, Sue Ham, and National Disability Service Tasmania CEO, David Clements. Sue and David outlined their organisation's roles and perspective on the the NDIS transition, and then joined keynote speakers Sandy Jeffs, Flick Grey and Judy Bentley on a panel, facilitated by Connie Digolis, CEO of the Mental Health Council of Tasmania.

The panel explored issues surrounding the transition to the NDIS with both professionalism and passion, based on the questions outlined here (PIR Panel 2016.pptx), and from questions from the audience.

Sue Ham  Tasmanian Trial Site Manager, National Disability Insurance Agency

Sue Ham returned to Tasmania to take up the position of NDIA Trial site manager in October 2012, and is currently the Regional Manager, Tasmania, and is a member of several governance committees for the agency.

Sue brings significant public sector (State and Commonwealth) and non-government sector experience to the NDIA including:   the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs spanning housing, remote Indigenous housing and community disaster recovery, and eleven years as Chief Executive Officer of Colony 47 Inc. and previous board positions at TasCOSS and ACOSS.

On a personal level, Sue has a strong interest in social policy and values the contributions that public servants and the community sector make towards supporting fairer and inclusive communities for all Australians.

David Clements   CEO, National Disability Service, Tasmania

David has worked in the not-for-profit sector for over 20 years in frontline, policy and project, education and training, management and senior executive roles across Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania.  Prior to commencing with NDS in early 2012, he worked as a Senior Policy Adviser in the Tasmanian Government and was the inaugural Chief Executive Officer with the Alcohol, Tobacco and other drugs Council of Tasmania.   He has significant experience in complex social systems reform across the areas of disability, alcohol and drugs, housing & homelessness, youth justice, child protection, mental health, and public health and has held a number of national roles related to much of this work.

David has a strong interest in workforce planning and development and its practical implementation. He holds post-graduate qualifications in Health Sciences (Policy), has run his own small business in Events Management, and brings to the NDS State Manager’s position a commitment to enhancing the partnership between government and the non-government sector in the delivery of disability services.

Judy Bentley   Carer

Judy is the principal carer of a now 34 year old son who has lived with severe and persistent mental illness for the past 14 years. Current Ministerial appointments include the Partners in Recovery Expert Reference Group, and the National Carer Strategy Implementation Reference Group. Other National representation includes the Mental Health Professionals Network Project Reference Group, Private Mental Health Consumer and Carer Network, and the Mental Illness Fellowship Carer and Consumer Committee.

Judy represents mental health carers on a number of committees in the ACT including the Ministerial Advisory Council on Mental Health, and the Capital Health Network Mental Health Strategic Advisory Committee, and is an active member of many NGO organisations supporting mental health in the ACT.

For nearly 8 years, Judy served as the ACT representative of mental health carers on the National Mental Health Consumer and Carer Forum, holding the position of carer co-chair for the last four years. Membership of the National Register of Mental Health Consumers and Carers continues. Judy has strong background and experience in the Australian Government, for many years in the Department of Health.

Video

PIR 2016 D1 Connie Digolis Panel Discussion

PIR 2016 D1 Connie Digolis Panel Discussion

PIR 2016 Conference Sue Ham on NDIS

PIR 2016 Conference  Sue Ham on NDIS

PIR 2016 David Clements (NDS) on NDIS Rollout

PIR 2016 David Clements (NDS) on NDIS Rollout

Day 1 Workshops

27 April, 2016

Sandy Jeffs:   Story Telling in Recovery

Sandy followed her opening address and participation on the panel with a workshop in which she talks informally with participants about her, and their, experience with story telling, writing and poetry, in recovery, and in life.

Click the thumbnail below to hear the audio of this workshop.

 

Flick Grey:   Intentional Peer Work

Like Sandy, Flick had a full program on Day 1 of the Conference. In this workshop, Flick discusses her knowledge and experience of peer work. The attached video is primarily an audio record from a fixed microphone on the podium.

 

Connie Digolis:   Mental Health System Reform

Connie Digolis is the CEO of the Mental Health Council of Tasmania (MHCT). Connie has been in the role since May 2015 after 8 years as the Executive Officer for the National Stroke Foundation in Tasmania. Connie brings to her role a wealth of experience in community sector management, advocacy, health promotion and training.

The Mental Health Council of Tasmania works closely with members and consults with stakeholders to harness the opportunity we currently have in this state to improve the outcomes for those living with mental illness in Tasmania and their families.

Recently MHCT provided a one-day seminar which brought together over 100 people from the mental Health sector to discuss the reforms and changes arising from the roll out of the NDIS, the new role of Primary Health Networks to commission mental health services and the implementation of the Rethink Mental Health 10 Year plan from the State Government.

In this workshop, Connie discusses the outcomes of the seminar at the PIR conference and provide the opportunity to highlight how the reforms will affect you and your organisation.

 

Rod Lambert:    Mental Health first aid and Suicide Prevention training in Tasmania. Changing community awareness and equipping services, staff, businesses, carers, families and others to be first responders.

Rod is a principal master instructor in Mental Health First Aid, and offers this across Tasmania through his own business “Lambert Training and Events”. Since 2006 he has presented over 260 courses. He is accredited to provide the standard, youth and teen versions of the course. He is also the project officer in the North of the state for Mental Health Carers Tasmania Inc., and an experienced funeral celebrant. Rod has worked in a variety of roles and capacities in the community sector – drug and alcohol counsellor/program manager, workplace support for EAP programs, pastoral care, crisis response worker after suicide loss, mental health program manager etc and also volunteers as a phone befriender with Lifelink Samaritans as well as training new volunteers. Rod is passionate about transforming our community attitudes towards mental unwellness and those living with it, to compassion, respect and hopefulness.

Rod has conducted over 60 free Mental Health First Aid workshops to community groups around Tasmania with funding from Partners in Recovery. He presented an overview of this training and looked at its scope and impact, and how the course has developed since beginning in 2000. He also explored future plans for specialty courses.

Video

PIR 2016 D1 Workshop Sandy Jeffs

PIR 2016 D1 Workshop Sandy Jeffs

PIR 2016 D1 Workshop Flick Grey

PIR 2016 D1 Workshop Flick Grey

Day 2 Plenary Session

28 April, 2016

Judy Bently:   A Carers Journey through Partners in Recovery to the National Disability Insurance Scheme

Judy is the principal carer of a now 34 year old son who has lived with severe and persistent mental illness for the past 14 years.

Current Ministerial appointments include the Partners in Recovery Expert Reference Group, and the National Carer Strategy Implementation Reference Group.  Other National representation includes the Mental Health Professionals Network Project Reference Group, Private Mental Health Consumer and Carer Network, and the Mental Illness Fellowship Carer and Consumer Committee.

Judy represents mental health carers on a number of committees in the ACT including the Ministerial Advisory Council on Mental Health, and the Capital Health Network Mental Health Strategic Advisory Committee, and is an active member of many NGO organisations supporting mental health in the ACT.

For nearly 8 years, Judy served as the ACT representative of mental health carers on the National Mental Health Consumer and Carer Forum, holding the position of carer co-chair for the last four years.  Membership of the National Register of Mental Health Consumers and Carers continues.

Judy has strong background and experience in the Australian Government, for many years in the Department of Health.

 

Tracey Harris:   Colouring a New Landscape - Providing Services Under the NDIS

Tracey is the Executive Director of Amovita Consulting and is a leading speaker and professional on developing high performance in the workplace. Tracey has worked in the human service industry for specialising in organisational and business excellence, leadership and performance for over 25 years. Having worked as a senior ministerial advisor, in senior management and in clinical practice Tracey leads the Management and Executive Consulting Division of Amovita.

Tracey has a career that spans three states of Australia and has clients in Australia and internationally. Tracey has provided lectureship at the Australian Catholic University, where she specialised in the fields of public and social policy, field education and mediation. In addition to her work as Lecturer and as Executive Director for Amovita Consulting, Tracey also has an interest in research on high performance leadership and neuroscience and has developed an integrated model of coaching and supervision in the workplace for high performance outcomes.

Tracey is currently an HDR Candidate with Griffith University researching in High Performance Supervision and supervisor training.

 

Mark Broxton:     Commissioning Community Based Mental Healthcare

Mark is the Director Clinical Services, Primary Health Network, Tasmania. He has a Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Science) and 30 years experience in diagnostic sciences and health management working in the areas of medical pathology, tertiary education, public health, and allied health services and assumed the role as Director of Clinical Services for Tasmania Medicare Local (TML) in November 2012 having had prior directorial and clinical management roles with TML and previously with Divisions of General Practice.

Mark is committed to identifying and implementing innovative ways of improving equity and access to primary health care including mental health services.  Mark has an interest in the importance of disease prevention, health promotion and community based health interventions in reducing negative impacts on health outcomes to individuals, the community, health clinicians and all other relevant primary health care stakeholders.  Mark has been closely involved with the provision of mental health services through programs such as Access to Allied Psychological Services, the Mental Health Nurse Initiative and Partners in Recovery.  Mark is the interim chair of the Tasmania Medicare Local Clinical Governance Committee.

 

Petrina Nettlefold and Lucy Lester:   Department of Health and Human Services Peer Work Consultations

Petrina Nettlefold is a researcher with the Department of Health and Human Services who is currently undertaking consultations in relation to peer work. Petrina is seeking participants for her project.

Lucy Lester has been involved in peer work for a number of years, and speaks passionately to the conference about its benefits.

 

Video

PIR 2016 Judy Bentley - A Carers Experience

PIR 2016  Judy Bentley - A Carers Experience

PIR 2016 D2 Tracey Harris

PIR 2016 D2 Tracey Harris

PIR 2016 D2 Mark Broxton

PIR 2016 D2 Mark Broxton

PIR 2016 D2 Petrina Nettlefold & Lucy Lester

PIR 2016 D2 Petrina Nettlefold & Lucy Lester

Day 2 Concurrent Workshops - Morning Sessions

28 April, 2016

Tracey Harris:   Professional Supervision as the Guiding Light - The PASE Model in Action

Research suggests that about nearly as many as 90% of professionals, managers, leaders and supervisors in the workplace have never engaged in formal or professional development training prior to becoming a professional supervisor. Today’s workplace encompasses complexities that require a new approach to supervising staff and leading for successful outcomes.

The nature and context in which supervising staff takes place has dramatically changed in recent years. With the advent of advanced technologies and the virtual world in which we work at times, ensuring staff feel supported, valued and appreciated is crucial for maintaining a high performing workforce. Professional supervision is one of the most effective ways to preserve this.

This one hour workshop presentation focused on an overview of Amovita’s six professional supervision models. We explore how to use the PASE, MASE, LASE, VASE, FASE & CASE models of supervision. The six models aim to support practitioners, leaders, managers, operational and administration staff, volunteers, team leaders and cultural supervisors. Interactive discussions aimed to explore how staff can ensure their supervision is effective. The quadrants of the model were examined to review how organisational requirements can be met, how staff can engage neuro self care principles as the motivating factor for quality health and wellbeing outcomes, and how staff can participate in ongoing development and growth in the supervisory environment.

 

Mark Broxton:    Getting Started with Commissioning

Following on from his plenary address, Mark conducted a workshop for those who wanted to learn more about Primary Health tasmania's approach to Commissioning, including:

  • Understanding what good looks like from a consumer and provider service perspective
  • The difference between health outcomes and health outputs
  • What are the big questions from providers and consumers

 

Matthew Spicer:    Motivational Interviewing - A 'Partner" in Recovery

Matthew is a registered psychologist who has worked across the disability, education and community service sectors supporting people with challenging behaviours and complex needs. His insights into how human needs are communicated through behaviour and his commitment to non-aversive behaviour management have had dramatic results and enhanced the quality of life of people of all ages.

Matthew’s values of compassion and social justice are evident through his work. He is committed to the use of positive support practices and their application within a framework of trauma informed care. Matthew has worked as a leader implementing a sector wide training initiative and in leading change management processes for services implementing Trauma Informed Practice. He has recently presented at national and international conferences regarding the efficacy of positive crisis management techniques within a non-linear multi-element model for supporting best practice in trauma informed care; including its application for people with an intellectual disability.

Matthew is also a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) and regularly provides training and coaching in motivational interviewing (MI). He is active in supporting the use of MI to assist people and organisations in the area of health behaviour change; assisting individuals and staff members to develop and use skills to live healthier lives.

 

Julia Fasina and Flourish Representatives:   Consumer Engagement in Mental Health Issues

 Flourish -Mental Health Action In Our Hands Inc., is an independent Tasmanian not-for-profit organisation established to provide a strong voice for the state’s mental health consumers.  Flourish works with consumers, government, service providers and families to ensure that the delivery of mental health services is meeting the needs and expectations of consumers.

“Consumer involvement makes mental health services more effective…….the paradigm shift from consumer “participation’ to consumer ‘leadership’ may be more fruitful in realizing the considerable benefits that result from effective consumer involvement in mental health services.”  Lei Ning, Consumer Advisor North Western Mental Health of Melbourne Health.

Consumer involvement in mental health service planning, delivery and system reform is of crucial importance if we are going to ensure a move towards person-centred services to meet the needs and expectations of consumers. But is it happening in Tasmania?  Is the concept of consumer ‘leadership’ truly embraced and supported?  Has the word ‘recovery’ become a rhetoric word with no real substance? Are consumers still considered as ‘patients’ with little say in their treatment or are they empowered consumers with choice in Tasmania?

This workshop, facilitated by Flourish consumers explored these questions with participants and what mental health services need to consider when shifting from a clinical model to a ‘recovery’ framework.

 

 

Video

PIR 2016 D2 Workshop Tracey Harris

PIR 2016 D2 Workshop Tracey Harris

PIR 2016 D2 Worshop Mathew Spicer

PIR 2016 D2 Worshop Mathew Spicer

Day 2 Concurrent Workshops - Afternoon Sessions

28 April, 2016

Olivia Hogarth and members of the Hobart and Launceston Human Libraries:    Human Library

The Hobart Human Library is a project of A Fairer World and was established in 2013. Olivia Hogarth has been the Project Manager since July 2015, coming from a background in teaching and more recently as a Community Development Officer at Working It Out, Tasmania’s gender, sexuality and intersex status support and education service. Olivia also volunteers on the committee of TasPride Inc, a not-for-profit organisation providing safe and inclusive social engagement opportunities for the LGBTI community in Tasmania. Olivia’s passions are social justice and equity, sustainable living, and good food!

Partners in Recovery Conference Workshop Outline:

The Hobart Human Library has been created to address discrimination and bullying through the power of personal storytelling. It is a library with a difference – the books are real, living people who have been trained to tell their stories.

Human libraries are used around the world as a simple way for people to build understanding and face their prejudices. They do this by providing a comfortable space for ‘readers’ to speak informally with a ‘book’ who has encountered stereotyping, stigma or discrimination as a result of their culture, religion, refugee background, gender, sexual orientation, physical or mental status.

The Hobart and Launceston Human Libraries are currently seeking expressions of interest from people with a lived experience of mental illness who would like to share their story to join our catalogue of ‘human books’. If this is you or someone you know please come along to our workshop to experience it first-hand. This project, including this workshop and the ‘human book’ training, has been funded by the Partners in Recovery Flexible Funding Program.

 

Judy Bentley:   Social needs in the Transition from Partners in Recovery

Judy participated in the panel on Day 1 and presented to the plenary of the conference in the morning of Day 2.

Following on from these contributions, Judy's workshop encouraged all players to work together to ensure the ‘social’ needs of NDIS psycho-social disability participants are not lost in the transition from Partners in Recovery.

Carers have benefited greatly from their loved one’s association with Partners in Recovery, and are concerned that the focus on ‘recovery’ and ‘socialisation’ support will be lost with the transition to NDIS.

How do we continue to provide the social support that has done so much to give clients the confidence to choose a life that they feel worth living?  What have been the most effective lessons learned from Partners in Recovery?  Do we need to keep the consortium approach that has been so effective in PIR?  Who are the partners we need to work with to provide the best method of support for the client group which has been supported by PIR?

 

Andrew Badcock, Working it Out:    MINDOUT! Mental Health project

In December 2014, Andrew Badcock joined Working It Out – Tasmanian’s gender, sexuality and intersex status support and education service – as a mental health project officer for the National MINDOUT! Mental Health project. This role focuses on working with mainstream mental health and suicide prevention organisations to assist them to be responsive to the lived experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or intersex status people and population groups. Doing so has led to relationship building opportunities with organisations around the state in the north, north-west, and southern regions.  In 2014 he was a recipient of the Tasmanian Human Rights Week LGBTI award for his use of personal storytelling, advocacy and education to build greater understanding and respect for LGBTI people.

Workshop

While many LGBTI Tasmanians live healthy and happy lives, Australian and international research consistently finds that LGBTI people remain at significantly increased risk of poorer mental and other health outcomes due to the consequences and effects of experiencing multiple forms of discrimination, prejudice and violence at individual, community and structural levels. Studies also find that LGBTI people may delay seeking treatment due to actual or perceived fear of discrimination.

Andrew’s workshop both provided and sought information about barriers that reduce quality of care for LGBTI people and what we can learn from this. Andrew outlined his work as project Officer for the MindOut project and then provided background on the 2 WIO PIR projects which address barriers to quality health services for LGBT and I Tasmanians.  Participants then worked together to identify barriers including those that may exist in their service and this was be followed by some practical ideas to address these.

 

MI Fellowship

MI Fellowship:    Effective co-locations while maintaining client focused services

Partners in Recovery Support Facilitators employed by MI Fellowship combined their knowledge and experiences to present this workshop.

As a PIR Consortium member, MI Fellowship Support Facilitators have established a number of co-locations with a range of services throughout the State. This workshop aimed to help people to understand the importance co-locations play in providing the best possible service to consumers. The workshop explored the potential benefits and barriers involved for all those concerned, when considering establishing co-locations, especially within the ever changing social and political landscape that we are all now encountering.

Video

PIR 2016 D2 Worshop Judy Bentley

PIR 2016 D2 Worshop Judy Bentley

Day 2 Conference Wrap Up

28 April, 2016

Tasmanian State Manager, Andrew Davis, wrapped up the conference, reflecting on what we had seen and heard, what we had learned and what we had to follow up. Andrew thanked all participants, speakers, organisers and presenters for what was already being seen as valuable and memorable conference.

Video

PIR 2016 D2 Andrew Davis Observations on NDIS & Wrap Up

PIR 2016 D2 Andrew Davis Observations on NDIS & Wrap Up